Chiucnahui Xochitl (CQ)

Chiucnahui Xochitl (CQ)
Compound Glyph
Notation

Glyph or Iconographic Image Description: 

This compound glyph-notation stands for the personal name Nine Flower or 9-Flower (Chiucnahui Xochitl or Chiucnauhxochitl), which is a date from the calendar. It consists of a right-angled group of ones (small circles), four up the left side of the flower and five across the top. The five circles along the top of the flower are painted--red, brown, and turquoise blue (one almost looks green, having some brown smeared over it) in no conceivable pattern. What is more, the four on the left are left unpainted, natural. The flower has three visible red petals and a white or unpainted base.

Description, Credit: 

Stephanie Wood

Added Analysis: 

Perhaps the uncolored circles were going to be painted, but were left unfinished because of an interruption or distraction. Otherwise, there may be an undiscovered, intentional motive for leaving some circles natural. The difference in coloring the circles does make the grouping of four and the grouping of five standout. As the context image indicates, 9-Flower is the name of an elite male, given that he is wearing a man's cape (tilmatli) and he sits on a jaguar-covered icpalli (Indigenous throne or seat of authority).

Added Analysis, Credit: 

Stephanie Wood

Source Manuscript: 
Date of Manuscript: 

covers ruling men and women of Tecamachalco through 1593

Creator's Location (and place coverage): 

southern Puebla state

Cultural Content, Credit: 

Randall Rodríguez

Parts (compounds or simplex + notation): 
Reading Order (Compounds or Simplex + Notation): 
Other Cultural Influences: 
Keywords: 

flower, flor, nine, nueve, numbers, números, names, nombres, dates, fechas, calendarios

Glyph or Iconographic Image: 
Glyph/Icon Name, Spanish Translation: 

Nueve Flor, 9-Flor

Image Source: 

The Codex Quetzalecatzin, aka Mapa de Ecatepec-Huitziltepec, Codex Ehecatepec-Huitziltepec, or Charles Ratton Codex. Library of Congress. https://www.loc.gov/item/2017590521/

Image Source, Rights: 

The Library of Congress, current custodian of this pictorial Mexican manuscript, hosts a digital version online. It is not copyright protected.

Historical Contextualizing Image: